A for Anandita

Ask me anything   A's life.
She takes too long to decide something.
@ananditatata

fullmetalmom:

I don’t care for pancakes, but I want to make these for the spawn!

fullmetalmom:

I don’t care for pancakes, but I want to make these for the spawn!

— 8 months ago with 17 notes
reddlr-food:

Tried my hand at the pasta pie, turned out great!

reddlr-food:

Tried my hand at the pasta pie, turned out great!

— 8 months ago with 1 note

ryanpanos:

Imperial Pomp - Post Soviet High-Rise | Frank Herfort

In documenting a unique phenomenon, the German photographer Frank Herfort has journeyed to the most remote areas of the former Soviet Union. After the collapse of the regime, a strangely pompous architectural style sprung up throughout the new republic. It conflates the aesthetics of monumental Soviet architecture with the Western language of form seen in the twentieth century.

— 8 months ago with 945 notes

ryanpanos:

NYC’s Golden Age of Bridge Building | Via

These days, we tend to think of New York’s bridges as traffic obstacles. But at the turn of the last century, the bridges that sprang up in thickets around Manhattan’s shores were objects of wonder and civic pride—near magical pieces of infrastructure that took many years (and lives) to build.

A New York Times article about the New Tappan Zee Bridge this week included a wonderful log of construction photos from the original crossing, which got under way in 1952. That was relatively late, compared to most of the city’s great bridges, and it made me wonder what other photos were floating around out there—not only of the Tappan Zee, but of the great boom in bridge building that began in the 1870s and lasted until the 1920s.

These were the years when the Brooklyn Bridge, the Manhattan Bridge, the Williamsburg Bridge, and the Queensboro Bridge were all built. The years when 27 workers (including the lead engineer) died building the Brooklyn Bridge, and when 30 died to build the “New East River Bridge,” aka the Williamsburg Bridge. When getting home from work could mean swinging from a single line of rope.

— 8 months ago with 229 notes

What I found in Qoo10.co.id. So cute!

— 9 months ago
#things  #lamp  #mixer  #mug  #egg 

ryanpanos:

Point Pleasant - Igloos | Joshua Dudley Greer

The West Virginia Ordnance Works (WVOW) was an explosives manufacturing facility constructed during World War II just outside Point Pleasant, West Virginia. Occupying 8,000 acres along the eastern bank of the Ohio River, the WVOW was built specifically for the production and storage of trinitrotoluene (TNT). At its peak, nearly 500,000 pounds of TNT were produced here each day and stored in a massive array of concrete igloos. The site was officially declared surplus and closed in 1945, after which time much of the land was deeded to the state of West Virginia for the creation of the McClintic State Wildlife Management Area.

In May 2010, one of the remaining concrete igloos unexpectedly and violently exploded. Government officials were brought in to investigate a number of igloos that were being privately leased to local businesses and citizens. After issuing several dozen search warrants, they discovered 14 separate igloos had been storing hundreds of thousands of pounds of unstable, heavy explosives. Due to the potential risk of another explosion this area was closed off to the public and remains under 24-hour surveillance. No remediation solution has yet to be determined.

— 10 months ago with 222 notes
eugenialoli:

One more animation based on my “Petaloudes" collage for the interactive iPad magazine "The Unlimited”.
Gallery | Shop | Tumblr | Flickr | Facebook

eugenialoli:

One more animation based on my “Petaloudes" collage for the interactive iPad magazine "The Unlimited”.

Gallery | Shop | Tumblr | Flickr | Facebook

— 11 months ago with 8473 notes